Skip to Main Content
Overview

Broadly speaking, corporate or transactional lawyers advise companies on a variety of transactions—including M&A, financings, and securities—in compliance with federal and state laws and regulations. Corporate generalists work across these disciplines and can sometimes act as “outside general counsel.” What a corporate generalist focuses on can depend a lot on their location. In New York, the work leans toward finance and securities work, while in Washington, DC, it tends to be more regulatory. On the West Coast, corporate attorneys often deal with venture capital and the issues affecting emerging companies. While there are certain large firms that encourage their corporate attorneys to have a broad practice, many require them to specialize in only one area. Attorneys who wish to be corporate generalists often look to practice in smaller firms or in smaller, regional offices of large firms where specialization is not required. Corporate generalists often have the most in-house opportunities because they have touched on so many areas.

Featured Q&A's
Get an insider's view on working in General Corporate from real lawyers in the practice area.
Amy Wollensack, Partner—M&A/Private Equity • Calvin McKnight, Associate—Corporate
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Amy: I represent private equity sponsors and companies in M&A and other investment transactions, including leveraged buyouts, mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, growth equity, and other complex transactions. I also provide advice on corporate governance matters and serve as an advisor to portfolio companies of my private equity clients.

Calvin: I advise clients on project development, acquisitions, divestitures, and strategic joint ventures involving a range of energy assets. In particular, I guide energy and infrastructure clients through all phases of drafting and negotiating agreements for the purchase, sale, development, and financing of energy and infrastructure projects in a wide range of energy sectors, including:

  • Upstream, midstream, and downstream assets,
  • Renewable and traditional power,
  • Oilfield services,
  • Liquefied natural gas (LNG),
  • Petrochemical, and
  • Related engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) matters.

What types of clients do you represent?

Amy: I represent private equity sponsors like Mubadala Capital, Paine Schwartz Partners, ICV Partners, Mill Rock Capital, and other private equity funds and strategic clients such as Adtalem, Aptar, True, and other companies.

Calvin: I represent sponsors, developers, project companies, commodity traders, utility companies, energy operating companies, sellers and buyers, financial institutions, and private equity investors.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Amy: I work on M&A and other investment transactions in a variety of industries, including software and technology, food and beverage, life sciences, healthcare, manufacturing, professional services, franchises, retail, and education.

Calvin: I have represented a midstream company in all aspects of a joint venture to develop and operate a crude oil pipeline; a midstream company in all aspects of a joint venture to develop and operate a natural gas gathering and extraction facility; multiple clients in the development of LNG export and import facilities throughout North America; an owner in drafting, request for proposal (RFP) issuance, bid analysis, negotiations, and contract execution management with international and domestic suppliers for the purchase of generating and manufacturing equipment and associated service agreements for multiple renewable energy and industrial facilities; and numerous public and private companies (developers, sponsors, and financial investors) in the purchase, development, and project financing of numerous solar-powered generation facilities throughout the United States.

How did you choose this practice area?

Amy: I was drawn to transactional work because in a typical transaction, both sides mostly get what they want, which means that typical interactions are not adversarial. I like M&A work because of the client interaction and the ability to work on different types of transactions and learn about a variety of industries and companies, which means that I never get bored. I also like that I work with large teams within the firm, which allows me to get to know a number of my colleagues well.

Calvin: My previous background as an engineer and project manager lends itself to this practice area, as I previously designed and managed the types of deals/projects I now work on as a lawyer. I also started working with Matt Kapinos, who lateraled to Akin in 2019, and who had a background in this practice area where my previous skill became of immediate use to his practice. We built a rapport that I wanted to continue pursuing and three-and-a-half years later I still work very closely with Matt.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Amy: There is no typical day in my practice, which keeps things interesting. I may be drafting documents, like merger agreements or operating agreements, I may be negotiating a deal in person or via Zoom, or I may be attending board meetings and offering general corporate advice.

Calvin: Our deals typically follow the life cycle of an infrastructure project; thus, what tasks I am performing depends on what phase of development the client is in with respect to such projects. Generally, I begin my day responding to client inquires with respect to current agreements being negotiated or questions concerning previous correspondences. If I do not have a scheduled client or internal deal meeting, I am likely performing substantive drafting or reviewing and revising a document, as I am generally in charge of drafting and managing the deals I am assigned to.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Amy: Corporate and Partnership Tax, Accounting for Lawyers, Corporations, and Securities are all good classes for an M&A lawyer. If contract drafting and negotiations classes are available, those are useful as well. If your law school has a business school where you can take classes, you may want to take private equity and M&A business school classes too—not only will this help substantively, but getting to know your counterparts in the business school will be helpful as you focus on business development later in your career.
Calvin: The practice area I am a part of is somewhat specific and niche. The agreements we negotiate and draft are not generic and most of the contractual terms are unique to project development deals and documents. The best way to develop skills in this area is to be a part of the deals from an early entry level and obtain as many experiences and repetitions as possible.


What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

Amy: The hours can be challenging. When you are in the middle of closing a deal, you may have to work long hours in order to meet tight deadlines for closing. Typically, this is balanced by slower periods when the hours are more manageable and you can take time off—it’s very important to take advantage of these slower periods when they come around so that you are ready for the busier periods.

What do you like best about your practice area?

Amy: I like working with our clients, meeting the management teams of acquisition targets, and if they are acquired, working with them to grow the business. I also value working with so many of my colleagues to achieve successful results for our clients.

Calvin: Our clients are generally sophisticated, and some have been building infrastructure projects for a long time. Thus, our clients know what it is they are looking for and can be specific about their desired results. This leads to less “guessing” on the commercial side of things when putting together contractual documents. Further, our projects deal with building and developing actual physical items, so it’s not just money or equity interest changing hands. The end result of a completed deal is a large function facility.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Amy: Our firm is focused on serving the needs of a broad range of asset managers, including private equity firms. This means that we have all of the services and specialty practices needed to suit our clients’ needs, including fund formation, acquisition finance, regulatory, tax, executive compensation, antitrust, and other specialty expertise.

Calvin: Our practice is unique within our larger corporate practice, as it’s a small group that becomes necessary for multiple types of clients; a traditional M&A or finance lawyer’s client may at some point desire to build an infrastructure project. When this occurs, our team is typically called. Given the amount of corporate partners, we can be in high demand given the uniqueness of our practice.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Calvin: Junior associates tend to perform tasks that are typical for general corporate junior attorneys, such as inputting comments from senior attorneys and partners, running comparisons on documents, and taking meeting notes on client or negotiation calls. What’s unique about our practice is that there is quite a bit of preliminary development that occurs prior to drafting the definitive document; thus, junior attorneys get to work on novel work products prior to drafting an agreement, such as unique issues list and provision summaries. Our documents can also include numerous exhibits and appendices that attach to the definitive agreement. Junior attorneys can often be tasked with managing and developing these exhibits and appendices.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

Calvin: Our group is constantly evolving. For example, the constant changes in government incentives for investing in infrastructure projects, and related tax benefits and other governmental funding, has our clients constantly looking for ways to leverage these incentives. We are usually called in to guide them on the aspects of utilizing such incentives to develop infrastructure projects.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain at this practice area at your firm?

Amy: Summer associates are given real world work, so a summer associate can expect to have the same opportunities as first-year associates. This means that summer associates may perform due diligence (i.e., investigation into the legal status of an acquisition or investment target), draft ancillary agreements, participate in negotiation sessions, draft board resolutions, maintain signing and closing checklists, and perform a variety of other similar tasks.

Amy Wollensack represents private equity and other corporate clients in a wide range of complex transactions, including mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, divestitures, recapitalizations, joint ventures, going private transactions, PIPEs, venture capital and growth equity investments, and other transactions. Amy also advises on corporate governance matters. She has extensive experience representing clients in domestic and cross-border transactions in a broad spectrum of industry sectors, including healthcare, life sciences, technology, entertainment, logistics, media, consumer products, food and beverage, franchise, automotive, software, manufacturing, financial services, agriculture, defense, and hospitality. As a result, she can anticipate and address industry-unique issues that often arise in the transaction process and structure the transactions efficiently. In 2023, Amy was recognized as a “Top Women in Dealmaking” by The Deal and named to Mergers & Acquisitions “2023 Most Influential Women in Mid-Market M&A.”

Calvin McKnight is an associate at Akin’s Houston office. Calvin received his J.D. in 2018 from the University of Houston Law Center, and received a B.S. in Engineering from Louisiana State University in 2008. He guides energy and infrastructure clients through all phases of drafting and negotiating agreements for the purchase, sale, development, and financing of energy and infrastructure projects. Calvin represents sponsors, developers, and project companies; commodity traders; energy operating companies; sellers and buyers; financial institutions; and private equity investors. Calvin has over a decade of energy industry experience, working as a project design engineer and project manager prior to practicing law, and is particularly experienced in midstream, LNG, oil and gas exploration and production, construction, and other related sectors.

F. Jamal Fulton, Partner—Private Investment Funds
Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

I’m a private fund formation lawyer, so I help our clients structure private investment funds (which are basically just pools of capital from various investors) and negotiate the terms on which their clients will invest in the funds we set up. As an example, if one of our clients wanted to form a fund to make investments in clean energy infrastructure, I would discuss the key commercial objectives of the fund with our client, help document those objectives in legal agreements that constitute the fund, and then negotiate those agreements with potential investors who would make binding commitments to fund the clean energy investments identified by our client to be made through the fund. 

What types of clients do you represent?

We intentionally maintain a broad client base. Our fund formation clients range from startup venture capital managers who are building their business around first-time funds to large, publicly listed private fund managers with hundreds of billions of dollars in assets under management. We also have a robust pro bono practice where we have represented tax-exempt charities raising private funds to invest capital in businesses that further their charitable purpose. We separately represent a range of investors, including ultra-high-net-worth individuals and families, charities and endowments, banks and other institutions, and sovereign wealth funds in their investments in private investment funds. This variety in clients keeps things exciting and helps us see the private funds market from various perspectives. 

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Our deals are as diverse as our clients. We helped a new fund manager, Concrete Rose, launch a first-time fund targeting investments in early-stage businesses founded by underrepresented people of color and/or that address significant social issues impacting minorities, and we worked with Acumen, a global anti-poverty charity, in the formation of a fund designed to build climate resilience in smallholder farmers in Africa. We’ve also worked with TPG and KKR, two major, publicly traded sponsors, in a number of funds, including large buyout funds, Asia-focused funds, social impact funds, and healthcare and technology funds. I also work with a large bank and a startup tech platform in bringing fund investments to high-net-worth individuals. Each deal is different and has its own challenges, but the common thread is bringing together a group of investors toward a shared investment purpose. 

How did you choose this practice area?

At Cleary, corporate lawyers are encouraged to try various types of corporate work to find the practice area that fits best. I tried a number of practice areas, including mergers and acquisitions, debt finance, capital markets, and bankruptcy, but I ultimately enjoyed the clients, deal pace, and team structure in the private funds practice. Shortly after settling on the private funds practice, I rotated to our London office and spent just under a year there working exclusively on private funds matters.  

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

My days are split between emails and calls on one hand, and closer attention to drafting and documentation on the other. We’re often raising multiple funds at the same time, so I spend much of my day on calls with clients and investors and trying to stay on top of emails providing advice on one-off issues or guidance on questions from associates. Once the day quiets down, I have the chance to really dig into a document that needs my attention, or to sit in my office with colleagues to talk through difficult issues. 

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I’m an advocate for people taking classes that interest them from professors whose style most engages them. No particular class is a prerequisite, but I do encourage law students to take at least one corporate-oriented class that interests them. I took a corporate bankruptcy class in law school that really helped me understand basic corporate principles, how companies fund themselves, and how tough issues are negotiated across stakeholders. I don’t practice in bankruptcy, but it was a great class for understanding those key concepts, and was more helpful than a private equity class with a different professor might have been. 

What do you like best about your practice area?

The private funds practice is really relationship driven. We work closely with our clients through every stage of fund formation, from conception, through deployment of capital, to exiting investments, and hopefully raising a successor fund. We often form strong working relationships with the other law firms representing investors in the funds, and there are a number of repeat players. Everyone is excited about the prospect of partnering together for a common investing goal, which usually makes negotiations more pleasant.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Much like our firm, our private funds practice has a culture of creativity and diversity of experience. We try to remain nimble, and every partner in the practice has a number of “majors” and “minors” covering various areas of the funds space, and also areas that are funds-adjacent or unexpected. For example, I’ve developed a sub-practice in social impact and ESG investing that doesn’t fill my calendar, but was an area of interest that the practice group encouraged and invested in. 

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area? 

We encourage our junior lawyers to take on significant responsibilities as soon as they feel comfortable. Our junior associates prepare first drafts of legal documents, participate in calls with clients and investors, and very quickly start handling smaller negotiations and interfacing directly with opposing counsel. A large fundraise involves hundreds of investors, which lends itself to getting junior associates involved quickly in issues, because it would be too much for the seniors to handle in a silo. 

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

The private funds industry has been on a growth trajectory, and I expect that to continue. I expect more new strategies within large sponsor firms, new firms formed by managers striking out on their own, and increased access for affluent individual investors who are new to private equity. The industry is also more regulated than ever, and I expect that trend to continue. There will be more opportunities for lawyers with varying interests to get involved in the space, as it has become an important part of our economy.

Jamal Fulton is a partner based in Cleary Gottlieb’s New York office.

His practice focuses on the organization and operation of private investment funds, including buyout, growth, social impact, conduit, and hedge funds. He also represents private fund sponsors in joint venture and co-investment arrangements, and limited partners in their investments in private funds.

Jamal has represented TPG in a wide range of fund matters, including the formation and operation of a number of its social impact, private equity, and growth funds, and in various co-investment arrangements; KKR in the formation of its technology growth, global impact, and pan-Asia funds; ESL Investments in fund matters, including matters related to its acquisition of Sears Holdings; Blackstone Alternative Asset Management in the formation of separately managed accounts and investment activities; Acumen, a global anti-poverty organization, in fund formation matters; and Concrete Rose Capital in the formation of The Concrete Rose Fund, which targets investments in early-stage businesses founded by underrepresented people of color and/or that address significant social issues impacting minorities.

Jamal joined the firm in 2012 and became a partner in 2021. In 2014, he was resident in the London office.

Stephanie Lane, Partner • Ibrahim Elshamy, Associate—Corporate
Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve Franklin & Hachigian, LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Stephanie: Corporate attorneys at Gunderson represent venture-backed startup companies and venture capital funds. We work with startups at all stages of their lifecycle, so about 70% of my time is spent representing companies. That work includes formations, venture capital financings, corporate governance, and M&A transactions. The remainder of my time is spent representing venture capital funds when they make investments into startups.

Ibrahim: As a corporate and securities associate, I provide comprehensive legal support throughout the lifecycle of companies. This includes assisting entrepreneurs in formation, governance, and operational matters. As the company grows, I address questions related to expansion and financing options. From day-to-day challenges to financings to M&A deals, IPOs, or direct listings, I am involved in every step. I act as outside general counsel for new companies without in-house legal teams, ensuring the smooth operation and growth of their businesses. Additionally, I represent venture capital investors in portfolio company investments, safeguarding their investments and facilitating healthy partnerships with founders for efficient operations and oversight.

What types of clients do you represent?

Stephanie: I work with a wide range of clients across many industries. My clients include software, fintech, direct-to-consumer, and life sciences companies, among others. I also represent venture capital funds and angel investors when they are making investments.

Ibrahim: I have experience working with companies across various industries, making me industry agnostic. Recently, there has been an increase of companies in artificial intelligence, healthcare/healthtech, fintech, and data security. In general, our clients typically have a technology component that plays a crucial role in enabling their business operations.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Stephanie: I work on a variety of transactions, primarily focusing on venture capital financings and sell-side M&A transactions. But as a corporate generalist, we also work on debt financing, buy-side M&A, and secondary transactions. Corporate attorneys at Gunderson also service our company clients’ day-to-day legal needs; since many of our clients don't have in-house counsel or have small in-house legal teams, we're accustomed to dealing with a wide array of legal issues, which includes smaller transactions that are outside of our core practice.

Ibrahim: Venture capital financings are a recurring drumbeat of our work, as we facilitate the deployment of capital from VCs into promising companies. This provides support and enables them to develop their ideas, expand their teams, and acquire the necessary resources to scale an idea into a valuable business. We play a pivotal role in the entire financing process, from structuring the deal and considering the economics involved, to leveraging our proprietary deal data and our market knowledge. We also implement governance and control mechanisms to ensure smooth investment operations. During negotiations, we navigate the term sheet, addressing important matters like board representation, voting rights, and share restrictions. Once the term sheet is finalized, we translate its provisions into the long-form transaction documents through a multilateral negotiation process between the company, various investors, and other stakeholders.

How did you choose this practice area?

Stephanie: I grew up in the Bay Area during the first dot com boom, so I always had an interest in startups. Heading into law school, I didn't know that representing startups and venture capital funds could make up my entire practice. During my interview with Gunderson, I was convinced this was the type of work that I wanted to do, in large part because the attorneys that I met had real excitement about their practice and their clients. This practice offered an opportunity for me to combine the practice of law with my long-held interest in startups, and to really tap into the excitement around startups in the Bay Area.

Ibrahim: During my formative years, I ran a small family business selling used cars, gaining valuable insights into the challenges faced by small businesses and the importance of legal and business advice. While attending Stanford Law School in 2012, I immersed myself in the vibrant startup ecosystem of Silicon Valley, developing a genuine interest in supporting startups beyond providing legal advice. In building strong relationships with my clients, I have become a trusted first point of contact during major events or when seeking advice, and I am grateful for the bond of trust we develop.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Stephanie: I represent a large number of clients with a wide variety of legal needs, so every day is different. I begin and end every day by evaluating and prioritizing my tasks. This may include reviewing financing documents, marking up a merger agreement, and addressing client inquiries on deals, equity grants, corporate governance matters, or other legal matters. Throughout the day, time-sensitive tasks may arise, such as drafting a term sheet for a new deal. Additionally, I provide legal guidance during board meetings. As a hiring partner, I dedicate time to recruiting and interviewing candidates, planning the summer associate program, and other recruiting matters. Every day is different and that keeps this job interesting.

Ibrahim: My daily routine encompasses two distinct aspects: providing advice to clients and handling drafting and negotiations. I make myself available through every possible manifestation to ensure seamless communication. In terms of drafting and negotiations, I focus on the details of the deals and other agreements. Currently, I am working on a significant and complex merger transaction. This involves reviewing legal documents, coordinating with specialists, and delivering results that are as protective as possible for our clients. As a corporate associate, I specialize in corporate and securities law, with additional knowledge in labor and employment law, executive compensation, tax, commercial partnering, and privacy. When needed, I collaborate with my specialized colleagues to translate complex concepts into a business-forward solution that best serves our clients' needs.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Stephanie: The best thing to prepare for this job is to gain firsthand experience working with startups. If your law school offers a startup clinic, that's a great way to get exposure to the startup and venture capital ecosystem and learn some terms that we use and ways that we structure transactions. Working in the legal department of a startup through an internship either during the summer or the school year is also a great way to get exposure. In terms of law school classes, practical, transactional-focused classes and classes that focus on negotiation skills are beneficial in building skills that we use in our everyday practice. Corporations, Securities Regulation, and IP classes also provide useful knowledge about the legal foundation of our practice.

Ibrahim: During my time in law school, I found practical classes to be invaluable. They emphasized drafting and provided a solid foundation of fundamental legal principles. Securities law and regulation courses were particularly valuable, as I use those skills daily. Tax classes were also immensely beneficial, giving me a comprehensive understanding of business transactions and their tax implications. Outside of the law school, I took computer science, financial accounting, and business school classes. These interdisciplinary studies have provided a deeper understanding of our clients’ pain points and processes. For instance, knowing computer programming helps me collaborate effectively with engineer clients.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

Stephanie: Balancing the needs of a large number of clients in a fast-paced environment can be challenging. Our deals tend to have short timelines and we don't always have advanced insight into upcoming transactions for our clients, and that can make advanced planning challenging. At any given time, I could be working on seven to ten venture capital financings, so good project management skills are required in order to successfully juggle so many deals. As corporate attorneys, we must be nimble and flexible in order to service our clients’ needs quickly and efficiently. The flip side of that is the practice is never boring, because there are always new things coming down the pipeline, and our clients are keeping us on our toes.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Stephanie: One unique thing about our practice area is that while we specialize in exclusively representing venture-backed companies and venture capital funds, our corporate attorneys are really corporate generalists. There aren't that many practices where you can work on venture capital financing, debt transactions, buy-side and sell-side M&A, and public offerings, sometimes all in the same week. It’s a unique practice in some ways, but also very general in other ways, and that offers some really great opportunities for professional development for our associates.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

Ibrahim: The summer associate program at Gunderson Dettmer offers a unique opportunity to explore various practice areas. Our firm's practice is divided into three main groups: corporate, technology transactions, and fund formation. As a summer associate, you will experience all three areas and determine which aligns with your interests and strengths. Throughout the summer, you will actively engage with clients, working on meaningful projects and gaining firsthand experience. This exposure allows you to make informed decisions about your future career path. At Gunderson Dettmer, we prioritize summer associate development and ensure a fulfilling and impactful summer experience. You won't be confined to a back office; instead, you'll be out front, actively involved in client work, providing valuable support and contributing to the team.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

Stephanie: For those who don't want to stay at a law firm and make partner, there are really exceptional exit opportunities. Some of our corporate attorneys go in-house to startups or venture capital funds. We also have attorneys who leave to do something more business oriented, such as becoming an investor or moving into an operations role at a company. The exit opportunities here are quite broad.

Stephanie’s practice focuses on representing emerging growth companies throughout their lifecycles and venture capital firms in their investment activities. She advises entrepreneurs on formation and corporate structuring matters and has significant experience advising technology companies on a wide range of corporate transactions, including venture capital financings and mergers and acquisitions. She also represents many leading angel investors and venture capital firms in connection with their investments in technology companies.

Ibrahim represents a wide range of emerging growth companies from information technology, consumer and enterprise software, AI/ML, financial, healthcare, e-commerce, and other industries. He has experience in corporate formations and structuring, venture capital financings, private secondary markets, cross-border transactions, mergers and acquisitions, public offerings, and general corporate governance and strategic matters. Ibrahim’s counsel with emerging growth companies spans the entire lifecycle, from guidance at the earliest stages through to an exit. Ibrahim also represents many leading venture capital investment firms in their portfolio company investments across the world. During law school, Ibrahim was an editor of the Stanford Law Review, a member of the Venture Studio at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and worked at both a startup and a seed-stage venture capital firm.

Benjamin Stulberg, Partner • Emily Cai, Associate—Corporate
Jones Day

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Our practice focuses on advising public and private companies and their boards and private equity funds on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, growth or minority investments, divestitures, and other major corporate transactions. In addition to representing clients in major corporate transactions, we work closely with companies’ management teams to strategize how to achieve their business objectives and coordinate with many of our colleagues across the firm in different offices and continents in different practices to provide practical advice on the issues that arise day to day from operating the business, including, among other areas, tax, labor and employment, employee benefits, IP, real estate, trade, litigation, etc.

What types of clients do you represent?

We represent many large public companies in many industries and sectors, as well as leading private equity funds (including large and middle-market buyout funds as well as growth equity funds) across the globe. Our clients include ABM Industries, Ansys, Astellas Pharma, Centre Lane Partners, Cortec Group, Diebold-Nixdorf, EagleTree Capital, Eastman Chemical, FleetCor Technologies, Flowers Foods, Hard Rock International, J.F. Lehman & Company, KKR, Koch Equity Development, Macquarie, Marathon Petroleum, MassMutual, Monster Beverage, Morgan Stanley, Newell Brands, Nordson Corporation, Orange, Organon, Parker-Hannifin, Procter & Gamble, Riverside, Sanofi, Sensata Technologies, Signature Aviation, STERIS, TopBuild Corporation, TotalEnergies, United States Steel, and many others.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Ben has counseled clients on numerous transactions in various industries, with a particular niche in public company and complex cross-border transactions. Ben also frequently advises clients on matters relating to corporate governance, shareholder activism, takeover preparedness, and SEC compliance. His representative experience includes: Marathon Petroleum's acquisition of Andeavor for $23.3 billion; MPLX LP and Marathon Petroleum's $20 billion acquisition of MarkWest Energy Partners; Goodrich Corporation's $18.4 billion merger with United Technologies; Sherwin-Williams' $11.3 billion acquisition of Valspar; various transactions for Procter & Gamble, including the divestiture of its beauty brands to Coty for $12.5 billion and the divestitures of its Folgers coffee business and its consumer health care partnership with Teva Pharmaceuticals; Avient's $1.5 billion acquisition of Clariant's masterbatch business; and Cleveland-Cliffs' $1.1 billion acquisition of AK Steel.

Emily has experience in the full range of private equity transactions, ranging from lead and co-lead transactions (including advising leading private equity sponsors such as The Riverside Company, J.F. Lehman, EagleTree Capital, The Cortec Group, and Morgan Stanley Private Equity in their change-of-control acquisitions and divestitures), co-investment transactions (including advising investors such as Koch Equity Development and Mass Mutual as equity financing sources to target companies), to passive co-investments (including advising investors such as GIC and Investco on co-investments and early-stage investments). Emily’s recent experience includes: Cortec Group’s acquisition of Little Sleepies, sale of Weiman Products to The Carlyle Group and TA Associates, and recent sale of Chauvet & Sons to Court Square; EagleTree Capital's acquisitions of CORSAIR, FuseFX/Pitch Black Group, AirTech Group, WaterFleet, and Gaylord Chemical Company; Morgan Stanley Capital Partner’s various add-on acquisitions by portfolio company AWT Packaging; J.F. Lehman's acquisition of Inliner and combination with IPR to create PURIS; and The Carlyle Group’s sale of Signode Industrial Group to Crow Holdings for $4 billion.

How did you choose this practice area?

Emily: After working on my very first M&A deal, I found myself deeply drawn to the dynamic challenges presented by the problem-solving nature of the practice. Private equity deals, in particular, are known for their intricate structures and complexities, and each transaction presents unique challenges that require a deep understanding of both legal particulars and business strategies, which I find extremely exciting. I thrive on the intellectual challenge of negotiating complex agreements, identifying issues, and finding innovative yet practical solutions to ensure the success of a deal and maximize value for our clients, while working alongside and learning from my colleagues at Jones Day in different practices and offices (and even on different continents on cross-border deals) every step of the way. I also appreciate the opportunity to work closely with clients who are intelligent and sophisticated investment professionals making high-stakes decisions for their businesses, which allows me to continue learning from them and gaining insights into various industries and sectors.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Depending on what stage of a transaction you are in, your day can vary drastically. Common tasks include performing due diligence, drafting agreements, negotiating with the other side’s attorneys, or doing general corporate counseling. Junior associates play a critical role in transactions, including assisting with due diligence, which—though tedious at times—is key to the transaction and requires the critical review of documents and identification of potential issues. Our team gets involved at the early stages of a transaction, offering strategic advice on the structure of the transaction from many different yet intersecting perspectives such as corporate, tax, executive compensation, etc., which requires us to work with team members from different practices all across the globe in a seamless manner. As a result, we approach matters with a fundamental understanding of our clients’ business objectives from day one, and that understanding carries through in every step of the deal and all team members, from senior partners to junior associates, conduct their tasks during the deal with these business objectives in mind. Tapping into the expertise of the more senior lawyers on the deal team and learning from them, our junior associates grow to be business-oriented lawyers who are focused on the details but at the same time without losing sight of our clients’ larger goals.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Ben: If you are interested in transactional law, I suggest getting in the habit of reading The Wall Street Journal or similar business publications. Law school—even transactional-focused classes—often teaches relevant case law. While this can be helpful in building an understanding of some of the issues you will encounter in practice, it has limited impact on your day-to-day practice, particularly as a junior associate. Having a solid understanding of the overall economy and business concerns of the day, however, will help you become more in tune with clients and the overall market.

What do you like best about your practice area?

Ben: There are so many things to like about M&A, including the fast-paced nature of transactions, complicated legal and practical issues, and camaraderie among the internal and external team during a transaction, but what I like most is at the end of a transaction, you feel as though you have helped your client advance an important goal—and knowing that you were an indispensable part of an integrated team made of lawyers from all different practices (and sometimes in different jurisdictions) who worked together that made it all possible. When we help our clients buy or sell a business, for example, they are typically happy at the end of the deal because they either got a business they desired or received a pile of cash for the business they owned. Either way, with limited exceptions, clients view M&A as value accretive instead of just a cost of doing business. Being a part of that process—and the team that made it happen—is incredibly rewarding. In fact, I would say that the best part of practicing M&A at Jones Day is the amazing group of colleagues I work with every day—they are the best amongst the best in the world.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Emily: In the Corporate practice, junior lawyers are a crucial part of the team and perform a variety of tasks, all of which are critical to the successful closing of transactions. Typically, the junior lawyer is responsible for performing the due diligence investigation of the acquisition target, including by coordinating with lawyers specialized in different subject matters relevant to the target’s operation (such as tax, labor, IP, etc.) so that we can identify and help anticipate potential legal risks and issues that might impact the deal. Junior lawyers have the opportunity to interact with and learn from the senior lawyers on the deal team and are oftentimes given the opportunity to draft ancillary transaction agreements and closing documents, negotiate with opposing counsel, and play a key role in coordinating the closing of the transaction. These tasks collectively contribute to the seamless execution of M&A transactions and provide junior lawyers with valuable hands-on experience in the intricacies of dealmaking—while also being mentored and trained on aspects of the deal that are managed by more senior lawyers.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

Our summer program lasts 10 weeks, which is shorter than most deals. So, it’s rare for a summer associate to be able to work on a transaction from beginning to end. Instead, we find ways to get summers involved in transactions at a variety of different stages and for them to experience the teamwork of a deal, including working with people in our office and practice, as well as other practices and offices, sometimes around the globe. In terms of assignments, summer associates often assist with due diligence and drafting certain ancillary agreements; they also sit in on negotiations and deal closings. We also frequently ask them to do research into relevant corporate law topics. Our goal is for them to have a solid understanding of how we work seamlessly across practices and offices and what a junior associate is typically asked to do, so that when they come back as a first-year associate, they can hit the ground running as a member of our global team.

What has been the most surprising aspect of dealmaking to you?

Ben: The creativity involved in dealmaking has been the biggest surprise to me. There is a misconception (maybe a playful joke) that a lot of what we do is just cutting and pasting provisions from other transactions. That could not be further from the truth. We are often tasked with finding unique and creative workarounds for difficult legal and practical issues that arise in a transaction—and in order to make that happen, it oftentimes requires the brains and minds of a global network of formidable lawyers across jurisdictions who are ready to jump in at a moment’s notice, which is exactly what we do here at Jones Day. I think this is one of the more enjoyable aspects of our job.

Ben Stulberg is recognized as a leading advisor in the United States' M&A market. Described by The Legal 500 as "a prolific player in public and cross-border M&A," he has represented clients in more than $100 billion worth of transactions. Ben focuses on public company representations and cross-border deals and frequently advises clients on matters relating to corporate governance, shareholder activism, takeover preparedness, and SEC compliance.

Emily focuses her practice on the representation of private equity funds in leveraged buyouts, divestitures, carve-out transactions, recapitalizations, restructurings, and joint ventures. She also regularly counsels private equity firms and their portfolio companies on corporate governance and general corporate matters, and has experience advising clients on growth equity investments, including preferred equity investments, secondary sales, debt and equity financings, co-investments, and other types of investments and strategic transactions. Emily has been recognized by The Legal 500 in 2022 and 2023 in the private equity buyouts category.

Tyler Ambrose, Associate
Kirkland & Ellis

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

As a general corporate associate, I get to work on assignments across several transactional practice groups, including mergers & acquisitions, debt finance, capital markets, and investment funds. 

I appreciate that the open assignment system lets me identify teams I enjoy working with for repeat deals.

What types of clients do you represent?

I have worked with large private equity clients and their portfolio companies, as well as smaller, closely held companies.  

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

My deals have ranged from topics including software companies, drug diversion monitoring technology, energy and renewables, transportation, construction, and infrastructure services. 

How did you choose this practice area?

I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do when I started practicing, so the general corporate option offered the professional flexibility that I needed to explore which practice areas suited me. 

The opportunity to work with highly skilled deal teams and individuals I enjoyed collaborating with also played a significant role in shaping my trajectory within our firm’s open assignment system.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Typical tasks for junior associates can vary, but an average day could include: 

  • reviewing contracts in a virtual data room 
  • drafting due diligence memoranda on potential targets 
  • engaging insurers and bankers 
  • advancing a pro bono project 
  • attending training sessions to get familiarized with a universe of documents that you’ll be seeing (often for the first time!)

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

For law students interested in mergers & acquisitions, I’d recommend taking a corporations class or participating in a transactional law clinic for a preview of and exposure to the work. With respect to useful skills more generally, try to develop an ability to identify and replicate good process management for each assignment that comes across your desk. 

And remember to be patient with yourself as you learn! Incremental mastery of small tasks will become a huge value-add to your deal teams, so don’t feel pressured to know everything all at once.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

You don’t need a finance or business background to become skillful in this practice area. Those backgrounds can certainly help you better contextualize certain tasks and work with specialists, but the volume and sophistication of the work that Kirkland sees provides plenty of on-the-job training. 

Many of the traits and skills that make for a successful deal team—being personable, having a solid command of process management, and identifying the strengths of your various deal team members—are things that you could already bring to the firm or that you could develop while you’re here.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Each deal can vary greatly. I’ve been afforded many opportunities to peek into a variety of industries in a relatively short period of time.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

Summer associates can expect meaningful project exposure. Summer associates can sit in on client and management calls and regularly meet with associates and partners for lunch, dinner, receptions, and more; plus, they will have time outside of the office to explore. 

What has been the most surprising aspect of dealmaking to you?

I was surprised at how soon I started engaging clients directly. Of course, it looks different for each deal, but even by my second year, I’ve appreciated opportunities to run with client communications and the internal confidence that that experience builds in my own lawyering ability.

Tyler Ambrose, Associate—Transactional

Tyler Ambrose is a second-year corporate associate in the Houston office of Kirkland & Ellis. He graduated from Harvard Law School and received his B.A. with Honors from the University of Virginia. 

Tyler served as an intern for the Honorable Chief Judge Michael Urbanksi in the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia.

Simon Sharpe, Partner—M&A and Private Equity • Robert Chiu, Associate—Corporate and M&A
Proskauer Rose LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Simon: Proskauer has one of the premier global M&A practices. We represent public and private companies and private equity sponsors and their portfolio companies in domestic and cross-border acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, carveouts, equity investments, and other significant corporate transactions. These transactions are frequently transformational for our clients, and we thrive on being our clients’ trusted advisors in executing their most complex deals. While our practice covers a wide range of industries and geographies, we have deep experience in media, technology, sports, asset management, health care, hospitality, technology, and consumer goods.

Robert: M&A involves guiding clients through all phases of a transaction—it’s something of a “generalist” corporate practice spanning everything from minority investments to major mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures.  M&A lawyers structure, negotiate, and see these transactions through, and the practice affords all sorts of opportunities for creative and critical thinking.

What types of clients do you represent?

Simon: I represent public companies, private equity firms, and other types of asset managers and founder- and family-owned businesses. I started my career at Proskauer after law school and, as a junior associate, started working with certain multinational public company clients that I still work with to this day. For these longstanding clients, M&A is an integral part of their corporate strategy, and my work for them is mainly on the buy side. On the sell side, working with founders on exits have been some of my favorite deals—a sale can be a major, once-in-a-lifetime achievement, so it is particularly gratifying to help them get to this pinnacle.

Robert: I’ve represented almost every type of stakeholder in a deal, though have mainly worked with strategic buyers and sellers (e.g., Accor, Arkema, Church & Dwight and Henry Schein) and middle- to upper-market private equity shops (e.g. Ardian, Investcorp, MidCap Financial, Morgan Stanley Capital Partners, and Ridgemont Equity Partners).

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Simon: I mainly work on M&A transactions for public company clients. I do a lot of work in the consumer goods industry, mainly for Church & Dwight, which owns a number of brands, such as Arm & Hammer, Xtra, Trojan, Waterpik, and OxiClean. Some recent deals include the acquisition of Hero Cosmetics (which owns Mighty Patch, a top brand in acne treatment products) and the acquisition of TheraBreath (a top mouthwash brand). Another cross-border transaction was the acquisition by Arkema (a France-based public company focused on specialty materials) of a global adhesives business carved out from Ashland (a U.S. public company). On the sell side, I recently represented Mosaic Dental Collective in its sale to Audax, a private equity firm.

Robert: While my practice is broadly industry-agnostic, I’ve worked most extensively on buy-side M&A for the aforementioned strategic clients, in particular within the consumer goods industry for Church & Dwight (including the Mighty Patch and Therabreath deals mentioned by Simon). Otherwise, the transactions I’ve worked on vary greatly in scope: from domestic to global, from growth equity investments to full-on acquisitions, for private companies or for publicly traded multinationals, and so on.

How did you choose this practice area?

Simon: I chose M&A very early and it was a main driver for my decision to go to law school. In college, I had an interest in business and investing—reading about Wall Street and deals that transformed industries drew me to law, New York, and M&A. When I started at Proskauer, I sought M&A work immediately, even though I was not yet assigned to the group. I enjoyed learning about our clients’ industries and businesses. I began to understand how deals get done by observing and learning from senior partners in serving clients and handling negotiations. This early experience was invaluable and got me hooked.

Robert: It came down in equal parts to the work and the people. M&A held substantive appeal to me for its wide-ranging, collaborative nature, sitting at the intersection of business and law. During my time as a summer associate at Proskauer, I also found my natural fit in our M&A group—it was where my closest colleagues, mentors, and cheerleaders emerged, and I’ve been grateful for that ever since.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Simon: M&A deals typically run for a few months, a perfect time to stay fully engaged without it starting to feel endless. My days change with each deal stage and I often handle multiple transactions simultaneously. In a deal’s early stages, I assist clients with high-level term sheets and collaborate with my tax colleagues to develop efficient structures. As a deal progresses, I contribute to drafting merger agreements and advise clients on how to address key diligence risks. Getting a deal done frequently involves engaging with opposing counsel in contentious negotiations.

Robert: True to the cliché, no two days in M&A are the same. Each deal has its unique heartbeat; you learn to be nimble because as a transaction progresses, you need to constantly navigate and respond to new and complex information. Negotiations (and pain points) become accordingly bespoke, which makes every matter a novel experience and a rich learning opportunity.

One thing that is certain is that as you advance in this field, your role evolves.  As a midlevel, an increasingly large share of my workday now tends to consist of long-form drafting, mentoring juniors, leading calls with clients or opposing counsel, and strategizing with partners. 

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Simon: Young M&A lawyers must grasp business language and develop an understanding of how investors think. In the M&A practice, you don’t need a J.D./M.B.A. to hit the ground running, but business school electives can go a long way, particularly courses in corporate finance, accounting, and valuation. It should be clear what classes to take at law school, some of which may be in adjacent areas (i.e., corporate finance, securities litigation/regulation, tax, antitrust, etc.). Try to get relevant experience between your 1L and 2L years. Read the financial press and take every opportunity to connect and network with M&A lawyers at firm-sponsored events at law school.  

Robert: I think the biggest assets you can bring on day one are the right attitude—that is, showing up with curiosity and an openness to learn—and foundational skills like writing, empathy, critical thinking, and attention to detail. Most practice-specific skills are learned on the job, though it also helps to stay on top of business journalism and world events, which inform the work we do and the industries we work in. 

What do you like best about your practice area?

Simon: Clients look to us for help with their most important and challenging deals. Serving them is a “team sport” that involves close collaboration with an incredible group of associates and partners across the firm. This collaborative approach is what I like best about M&A, particularly how the practice touches multiple specialty areas (e.g. antitrust, IP, environmental, tax, capital markets, employee benefits, and executive compensation). I am constantly learning from colleagues and have opportunities to bring the collective expertise of the firm to bear for clients, which I find very rewarding.

Robert: Dealmaking in M&A is fundamentally collaborative. Clients and their counterparties are making a go at either building something together or helping each other achieve mutually conducive goals, and it’s exciting to be a trusted advisor in that process. 

As an M&A lawyer, you also work closely with specialists across your firm as well as with local counsel across any number of jurisdictions. Pair that with the frequent and early client contact that comes in this practice area and you’ll find that the job can actually be highly rewarding for an extrovert: you truly see all the pieces and personalities needed to bring a deal together, and you make more than a few friends along the way.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

Robert: Some have the impression that lawyers don’t need to be math or business savvy. But it’s vital to understand the dollars and economics that drive a deal: client motivations shape everything we do, and in M&A specifically, it’s key to understand how funds flow informs the documents you’re drafting and vice versa. A basic grasp of financial statements and Excel can go a long way.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Robert: Lean staffing on our matters means every associate down to the most junior gets to meaningfully integrate with their team and truly take ownership of what’s under their charge. There’s a level of consistent visibility and responsibility that makes it easier to engage with and become truly invested in your work and development, especially at an early juncture.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Simon: Junior M&A lawyers are an integral part of every stage of a transaction. In the early stages, junior associates will conduct due diligence on a target company and coordinate with our specialist teams in communicating our diligence findings to the client. Juniors will also prepare disclosure schedules and draft ancillary transaction documents. As a deal approaches closing, juniors will help manage closing logistics. Most importantly, junior associates have a seat at the table—getting shadowing opportunities, whether on client calls or in negotiations with the other side. It’s a critical part of how associates grow and develop. By watching senior colleagues debate a point or strategize in making tradeoffs to get a deal done, juniors learn both the technical aspects of M&A practice and the “art of the deal.”

Simon Sharpe, a partner in the Mergers & Acquisitions and Private Equity Groups at Proskauer, specializes in representing public and private companies and private equity sponsors and their portfolio companies in domestic and cross-border merger & acquisition transactions, including leveraged buyouts, joint ventures, restructurings, minority and growth equity investments, and other strategic transactions. Simon also has experience with corporate carveouts, GP-led secondary transactions, bankruptcy sales, and recapitalizations, and frequently counsels clients on a variety of securities law, corporate governance, commercial, and strategic matters. Before Proskauer, he had experience in investment banking and in litigation at a Canadian securities regulator. In 2019, Simon was recognized as a “Rising Star” in M&A by New York Super Lawyers.

Robert Chiu is an associate in the Corporate Department and the Mergers & Acquisitions Group. His practice involves advising public and private companies in various industries on domestic and international transactions, including mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, buyouts, joint ventures, reorganizations, and corporate governance. Rob is active in pro bono, particularly in efforts related to immigration and asylum, and he also co-chairs the firm’s Asian Lawyer Affinity Group. Prior to joining Proskauer, Rob also completed a human rights fellowship in The Hague and worked in marketing at the Clinton Foundation.

Kimberly Spoerri, Partner—Mergers & Acquisitions
Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

My practice entails advising clients in connection with different types of corporate transactions, including mergers and acquisitions (public and private deals), joint ventures, spin-offs, asset dispositions, and minority investments. I also advise boards of directors on various ordinary course corporate governance matters as well as in connection with activist campaigns.  

What types of clients do you represent? 

I represent a range of clients across many industries. This year, alongside teams of talented Cleary lawyers, I represented American Tower in its acquisition of CoreSite, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company in its pending acquisition of Nimbus Pharmaceuticals, and GSK in its acquisition of Sierra Oncology. I also represented Bed Bath & Beyond in connection with its entry into a settlement agreement with an activist investor.

What types of cases/deals do you work on? 

I have really enjoyed the variety of transactions and the range of clients I have been fortunate to work with in my practice. I have worked on a number of minority investments both on the buy side and the sell side. I have worked on acquisitions of companies ranging from small biotechs to large public companies. I have worked on the buy side and sell side of acquisitions of family businesses. I find it incredibly interesting to spend part of the day advising a large public company on a sale and then, later in the same day, advise a smaller family-owned company on its first capital raise from an outside investor.

How did you choose this practice area?

I started at Cleary in November 2008. While I knew I wanted to do corporate work, I was not sure which area of corporate law I wanted to focus on. I was lucky enough to get staffed on an M&A deal a few weeks after I started and basically never looked back. M&A is not for everyone, but I love the pace of the deals. We are often working on tight timelines to get deals done. For both the lawyers and the clients, it is often an “all-hands-on-deck” situation. I love the energy and comradery that M&A deals often foster. I have also been lucky to have a number of mentors in my practice group who have taught me a lot and created a great atmosphere in which to practice.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

There is no typical day in M&A, but there are typical activities that tend to make up most of my days. I spend a lot of time reviewing agreements and negotiating them with opposing counsel. I also spend a lot of time on calls discussing transaction strategy with clients, which is probably my favorite part of the job. I am often on the phone—either with colleagues or other advisors on a transaction (e.g., financial advisors or accountants)—catching up on general deal process or specific deal points. While an M&A lawyer is essentially leading the M&A transaction at the firm, a number of other lawyers can also play vital roles on any given transaction. In any deal, the most important issues may be related to intellectual property, employment, or tax matters (or a combination of all three!). Working hand in glove with our colleagues in those areas is key to ensuring that our client gets the best outcomes in a transaction. The M&A team often has a bird’s-eye view of the whole transaction: you know what’s going on with the client, what’s going on internally with colleagues outside the M&A team, what the other advisors are doing, and what opposing counsel is up to. As a result, you end up spending a lot of time coordinating among those various groups.  

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I would recommend staying on top of the business section of the newspaper as a good start. There are typically lots of interesting stories about hostile deals, activist campaigns, big public mergers, and governance issues at all sorts of companies. We regularly deal with all of those things as M&A lawyers in our day-to-day practice. In law school, I would advise taking a good variety of corporate law classes (for example, Corporations Law and Securities Regulation). At Cleary, we have a two-week “mini-MBA” training program that provides lawyers with an overview of business law. We also have periodic teach-ins on various practical skills for M&A associates, which associates have found very helpful in their practice.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

One of the most challenging things about being an M&A lawyer is the timeline on which we are asked to do transactions. It’s not unusual to hear from a client that a deal we thought was off the table will need to be done from start to finish in less than a week. Coordinating a large team, managing clients, and dealing with opposing counsel can often make for late nights. However, those high-pressure, fast-moving transactions are often the ones that are the most fun. You really get to bond with your internal team and the client team when everyone is asked to perform under that sort of pressure. I can say from experience that clients appreciate us the most when we are put in that position and continue to excel.

What do you like best about your practice area?

I love being the person that a client calls when they have a challenging question and being able to answer quickly and accurately to put them at ease. What we do is very closely tied with important business objectives of the client, which allows us to speak not only to other lawyers, but with executives throughout the company and the board of directors. Serving as a key point of contact for all of those constituencies and helping to ensure that our main contact at the client (often in-house counsel) is best prepared to address their internal stakeholders are the aspects I enjoy best.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

One of the misconceptions that exists about M&A is that you must be combative to be a good M&A lawyer. My experience has shown that nothing could be further from the truth. Transactions are often done most efficiently when the counselors on opposite sides of the table respect each other and have a collegial relationship.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

An attorney who practices M&A at Cleary generally has a wide range of options for his or her career path. Of course, some people will stay at the firm and practice M&A here for their whole careers. For those who would like to explore alternative career paths, there are tons of great opportunities. M&A attorneys from our firm have proceeded to work at major television networks, large media companies, well known sports leagues, premier investment banks, and important tech companies of various sizes (running the gamut from startups to the biggest names in tech). Some alumni continue to practice law while others pivot to the business side once they leave the firm. We also have many alumni working for government agencies and nonprofits. The M&A practice truly gives you a broad base of knowledge, which prepares you well to do a variety of jobs in a wide range of industries in your post-law firm career.

Kimberly R. Spoerri is a partner based in Cleary Gottlieb’s New York office. Her practice focuses on public and private mergers and acquisitions, private equity investments, and corporate governance matters. She also regularly represents major investment banking firms acting as financial advisors to acquirors or target companies.

Kim has been recognized for her work as an M&A lawyer by IFLR 1000 and The Legal 500 U.S. (Large Deals $1BN+). In 2021, she was named “Mergers & Acquisitions Lawyer of the Year” at Euromoney Legal Media Group’s Americas Awards and was named among The Deal’s “Top Women in Dealmaking” for M&A. In addition, Kim was honored in 2019 as a “CUP Catalyst” by the Council of Urban Professionals for her work as an agent of change in the field of law.

Kim joined the firm in 2008 and became a partner in 2017.

She received her J.D. from the New York University School of Law, where she served as a Senior Executive Editor on the New York University Law Review, and a B.A. from Princeton University.

Vanessa Jackson, Partner—Corporate Department, Finance Group
Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

As a member of Davis Polk’s Finance group, I work on a broad range of transactions, including leveraged and investment grade acquisition financings, asset-based credit facilities, debt restructurings, spinoffs, working capital financings, debtor-in-possession financings, exit financings, and other secured and unsecured financings. Each deal is unique, with different dynamics depending on the nature of the transaction, the parties involved, and the deal structure. In addition, my practice is incredibly interpersonal. For example, instilling trust in your clients and communicating effectively with opposing counsel are crucial components of the successful execution of a transaction.

What types of clients do you represent?

I represent borrowers and lenders on a broad range of finance matters, and that breadth of matters is among the things I greatly enjoy about our Finance group at Davis Polk. Representing a company acting as borrower requires a different skill set than, say, serving as counsel to a financial institution providing the financing. On the lender side, my clients range from large institutional banks to alternative direct lenders, each of which may have different sensitivities and risk appetites with respect to a given transaction.

Toward the beginning of my career, I focused primarily on representing lenders, but there was a turning point for me when I started representing corporate borrowers—that experience helped to deepen my understanding of corporate finance and develop my expertise on its various complexities. I became a more well-rounded lawyer, and having varied perspectives enables me to advise my clients more effectively.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

I work on a variety of transactions related to acquisition financings, including both strategic acquisitions and private-equity-led leveraged buyouts. In addition, I work on investment grade credit facilities, both in the context of acquisitions and working capital facilities, as well as on restructuring-related financings for distressed companies. It is an incredibly interesting and complex area of the law, and I value the opportunity to work on such a variety of financings that address the needs of clients in various industries.

How did you choose this practice area?

I started my legal career with a six-month rotation as an associate in the Restructuring practice group, and I very much enjoyed the substance and day-to-day work during my rotation. I then rotated into the Finance group and was drawn to the dynamic nature of the practice and the opportunity to take on a meaningful role in transactions as a very junior lawyer. The finance practice is fast moving, and I found the nature of the deals to be engaging and intellectually stimulating. From a junior point in my career, I was able to interact directly with clients, take an active role in meetings, receive meaningful drafting experience, and lead conference calls. While the substance of the work was foreign to me initially, I was drawn to the energy and excitement of the deals, and by diving into the work, I was able to learn quickly.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Every day is different, and, frankly, that’s one of my favorite aspects of the finance practice area. I spend time advising clients and answering questions from clients, associates, and partner colleagues about existing deals or discussing possibilities relating to structuring new deals. Lending transactions and the practice of law in the finance area are ever evolving, so it’s important to be fully up to speed on market trends to ensure that our clients are familiar with and taking advantage of the latest technology.

Outside of working with clients, I spend a great deal of time with the associates in our group, both leading trainings and discussing their work product on any given transaction. The teaching aspect of my role is one my favorite parts of my job—it’s amazing to see a junior lawyer develop confidence and take ownership of a transaction. Finally, I am heavily invested in the firm’s business development activities, which range from client lunches and events to speaking at our group’s annual symposium focused on current and developing trends in the investment grade financing space.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I believe one of the keys to success in the Finance group is to have an open mind. I encourage associates and colleagues to come into every meeting prepared for a robust dialogue and ready to learn new things, which leads to personal development and, I’ve found, to better outcomes for our clients. If there is a term that you do not understand, make a note to yourself, and look it up when you have time. Being eager to learn is more important than any specific experience or class. Prior to Davis Polk, I did not have a finance background or, frankly, any meaningful prior experience or exposure to professional environments, but I made sure to soak up as much as I could from my involvement in each deal. Every deal will teach you something new, and if you can take that experience and use it on your next deal, you will bring value to the team.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

The terminology and financial jargon is one of the most challenging aspects of the finance practice. Much of what you hear will be completely new, which can be overwhelming at first. In the Finance group, we ask a lot of our associates from the early stages of their careers, including drafting various documents and interacting directly with clients. Jumping in on deals as a junior lawyer can be intimidating, but it also instills confidence in our junior lawyers that is invaluable and carries them throughout their careers.

What do you like best about your practice area?

The finance practice area is incredibly dynamic, and working in Davis Polk’s Finance group puts you at the cutting edge of the market. Clients come to us with their most complex matters, which may often be issues of first impression. We are able to work closely with our clients, as well as their counterparties and opposing counsel, to craft financing structures that meet everyone’s needs. As a finance lawyer, the market moves fast, and terms change quickly, so it is critical that you stay on top of these shifts and are able to adapt to the new landscape quickly to ensure that your clients are receiving the best deal execution. I am consistently challenged as a lawyer in Davis Polk’s Finance group and enjoy the opportunities to think creatively in order to solve our clients’ most challenging issues.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Junior lawyers are incredibly valuable assets to the Finance group and are fully integrated on the deal team. They attend all conference calls on a deal and are often the first contact with opposing counsel and clients on emails. Junior associates interact with clients and opposing counsel from the beginning of their careers and manage the internal process at Davis Polk, coordinating work with all specialist groups (tax, intellectual property, etc.). Junior lawyers receive drafting experience from a very early stage in their careers and often lead the charge in managing the closing process of our transactions.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

Historically, traditional, regulated banks were the main source of financing for borrowers. However, we’ve seen more and more credit funds and direct lenders enter into this space. With a large amount of capital in the private debt space, these direct lenders are able to compete with traditional banks for financing opportunities. Companies are well aware of this competition and are beginning to look at different types of lenders for their financing needs. It will be interesting to see how the practice evolves as direct lenders and traditional banks continue to compete to provide the most attractive financing terms to corporate borrowers and private equity sponsors.

 

As a partner in Davis Polk’s Finance practice, Vanessa advises financial institutions and corporate borrowers in a broad range of finance transactions. These include leveraged and investment-grade acquisition financings, asset-based credit facilities, debt restructurings, spinoffs, working capital financings, debtor-in-possession financings, exit financings, and other secured and unsecured financings. She co-authored the “Law and Practice” and “Trends and Developments” sections of the USA chapter of Chambers’ Banking & Finance 2021 global practice guide.

Vanessa earned a B.S. in Economics from Duke University and her J.D. from Columbia Law School, where she was Managing Editor of the Columbia Journal of Race and Law. She joined Davis Polk in 2012 and was elected partner in 2019.

Davin Laskin, Associate • Yihsin Wang, Associate
Kirkland & Ellis

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Davin: I am a general corporate associate, which grants me discretion to take assignments in a variety of transactional practices, though I mostly work in M&A/private equity. I appreciate the flexibility this position offers not only in granting a broader perspective of the different corporate groups, but also to become a more well-rounded attorney because of opportunities to see deals from the perspective of the M&A, investment funds, capital markets, and debt finance teams.

Yihsin: I am a general corporate associate, which allows me to take assignments from Kirkland’s transactional practice areas, including M&A, capital markets, debt finance, and investment funds.  

What types of clients do you represent?

Davin: I work primarily with private equity firms, including some located locally here in South Florida as well as throughout the country. 

Yihsin: I have had the opportunity to work with public and private equity clients and have been bankside on a capital markets deal. Following acquisition by our private equity clients, I have also continued working with portfolio companies on add-on acquisitions. 

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Davin: I have had the opportunity to work on M&A deals with private equity firms, both to acquire other companies or their assets, or to sell or spin off companies in their portfolio. Having the opportunity to work on both the buy and sell side of deals as a junior attorney really helps to build a birds-eye view of how transactions work and to become familiar with the various tasks and responsibilities of each side. I've also worked on matters with the debt finance group to ensure financing of M&A deals. 

Yihsin: I have been involved in a variety of deals across the transactional practice areas, including M&A, PIPE transactions, de-SPACs (mergers between a Special Purpose Acquisition Company and a target), leveraged acquisition financings, and fund formations.  

How did you choose this practice area?

Davin: I worked in litigation as a paralegal prior to law school, but I found I preferred the collaborative nature of transactional work. My undergraduate background was focused on business, and I prefer how the corporate practice blends substantive legal work with business knowledge and advice. 

Yihsin: The general corporate pool appealed to me because of the exposure to so many types of deals and teams. The practice allows the flexibility to choose the work that interests you and the clients and teams that you’d like to work with. 

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Davin: It's hard to say what a "typical day" is like because it can vary in so many ways. As a junior associate, many of my tasks involve doing due diligence for transactions, working with our various specialist groups to coordinate diligence requests, coordinating with overseas counsel, overseeing our virtual data rooms and checklists, and participating in calls with clients and attorneys on the other side of the deal. 

Yihsin: Junior associates are very involved in the deal process from the beginning, which makes each day different and exciting. Tasks can range from drafting documents and reviewing contracts to collaborating with partners to leading management calls and client calls. 

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Davin: I would recommend taking courses that focus on business associations and finance. Even if many law school courses don't deal directly with transactional work, having a deeper understanding of the nature of finance, lending, and corporate structures will help "decode" much of the language you'll come across early in your practice. In terms of the firm practice itself, I find that being detail oriented is one of the skills that lends the most value to your team as a junior associate.

Yihsin: Being a lawyer requires attention to detail and organization. Specifically for the corporate groups, being commercially aware is helpful in understanding the deal process and timeline. Kirkland has an abundance of partner-led trainings as well as on-demand videos through our Legal Education Department platform LearningLink and precedents, which help us develop our skills. 

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Davin: I think Kirkland is really in a league of its own when it comes to M&A in the private equity space. We work with the largest PE firms in the world as well as lower- and middle-market firms—it's not unusual to be working on deals with enterprise valuations under $100 million alongside multibillion-dollar deals. Kirkland’s open assignment system also allows associates a higher degree of discretion in choosing which clients, deals, and partners they'd prefer to work with, so we have the opportunity to align our career trajectory with our interests and goals to a greater degree than many of our peer firms. 

Yihsin: What is really unique about Kirkland is our open assignment system. This system allows you to choose your own deals and deal teams based on your interests, while gaining mentorship and support from partners and a workflow team. What’s different here is that we can work across a range of groups at the same time, as there is no set rotation.  

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain at this practice area at your firm?

Davin: Summer associates are given opportunities to work directly with associates and partners, including contract review, diligence, client meetings, and coordination of administrative documents like working group lists. 

Yihsin: Summer associates gain a preview into the general corporate practice area and the open assignment system the day they join. Our workflow team ensures that summers are matched with their interests and provided a diverse experience. 

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

Davin: At Kirkland, it is understood that everyone has different career goals. Corporate attorneys who leave the firm often go in-house with clients or other companies or join private equity firms. The firm’s internal career services group, CareerLink, helps attorneys achieve their individual goals, whether that be internal advancement or transitioning to an in-house role. 

Yihsin: Corporate lawyers gain a diverse skill set by working at a large law firm, and those skills can be transferred into different types of career paths. Some lawyers end up going in-house or working at various organizations, such as Fortune 500 companies, banks, nonprofits, and more. 

What has been the most surprising aspect of dealmaking to you?

Davin: Having come from the litigation side before law school, I found the pace and flow of transactional work to be the most surprising. Rather than work on a couple of long-term matters, I can jump on dozens of fast-moving M&A deals, some of which take only a few weeks from beginning to close. Kirkland’s open assignment system also grants flexibility to take on deals that accommodate your schedule and workload. For example, if you know you’ll be less busy over the next month, you can join a fast deal that’ll keep you busy over a shorter period. M&A isn’t known anywhere for being the most predictable, but Kirkland does a great job of giving you some of that control back. 

Yihsin: At Kirkland, you have the opportunity to work on some headline deals with top-tier clients. It’s amazing to see your transactions in the newspapers and work on deals for companies that produce items you use in your day-to-day life. 

Davin Laskin and Yihsin Wang, Associates—Corporate (2023)

Davin Laskin is a first-year corporate associate at Kirkland & Ellis in Miami. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law in May 2022. During law school, Davin was a 1L summer associate with Porter Hedges in Houston, and a 2L summer associate at Kirkland & Ellis in Houston. Davin received his B.A. in economics, magna cum laude, from the University of Miami. 

Yihsin Wang is a corporate associate at Kirkland & Ellis in the New York office. She graduated from Fordham University School of Law. Yihsin received her Bachelor of Science from New York University. 

Steven R. Burwell, Partner—Corporate
Proskauer Rose LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

My practice area is capital markets, which involves representing private companies, public companies, investment banks, and investors in the process of issuing or investing in debt and equity securities. I also advise public companies on corporate governance, disclosure, and other general corporate issues.

What types of clients do you represent? 

Much of my practice involves representing global investment banks as the firm arranging and selling debt and equity securities deals, but I also enjoy working with a range of companies from larger public companies to smaller public or private companies. I also represent institutional investors from time to time in securities deals.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

While I enjoy working on a wide range of deals, my practice has been weighted towards equity capital markets transactions, which include initial public offerings, follow-on/secondary offerings, convertible deals, block trades, and transactions for Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (SPACs).

How did you choose this practice area?

I didn’t have any real exposure to capital markets before law school, but enjoyed Securities class and other related courses in law school and was attracted to a practice that combined transactional work and advisory work, and had a deep regulatory overlay.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Every day is different, but a typical day might involve a conference call with a bank advising an issuer on transaction process or structure, reviewing disclosure documents for accuracy and completeness, negotiating a contract with counsel on the other side of a deal, pitching a new client on our capabilities, and recruiting and training associates.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I know capital markets lawyers who worked as accountants or bankers before law school. While it is helpful to have a finance or accounting background to be a capital markets lawyer, I didn’t—I worked at a nonprofit organization before law school. Most of the skills you can pick up in law school and on the job, but I think the most important thing is being interested and excited about the practice area and constantly reading up on what is happening in the market. I always advise younger lawyers to follow the market and read the financial press.


What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

One of the most challenging aspects is one of the same things I find the most rewarding—the rules governing public companies and securities transactions are always evolving. It can be a challenge to keep up with changes in practice, but it also keeps everything fresh and exciting.

What do you like best about your practice area?

One of the things I like best about my practice area is that, while every transaction is negotiated, generally all parties to a deal have a common goal of achieving a successful capital markets transaction. It is rewarding to help companies raise capital and watch them grow.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

This isn’t unique to capital markets, but capital markets is one of the broader practices in the sense that a typical transaction will involve members of our practice area, but could include lawyers who do mergers & acquisitions, tax, employee benefits, litigation, intellectual property, and other regulatory areas. It is great to work with lawyers from across the firm on a deal or matter.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Some typical tasks include conducting research on precedent transactions, performing due diligence on companies or counterparties, drafting transactional documents, or preparing disclosures. We tend to staff matters leanly so client interaction comes very early.

With over 20 years of experience advising on and executing capital markets transactions, Steve Burwell focuses on corporate and securities law matters and public company representation across all industries, including, but not limited to, financial services, healthcare, and life sciences.

Steve offers clients extensive experience within the banking industry that makes him uniquely positioned to counsel issuers and underwriters on a wide array of debt and equity capital markets transactions. Steve has enjoyed a significant and lengthy career at Deutsche Bank, holding various legal positions within the organization. In addition to his tenure at Deutsche Bank, Steve has practiced in the New York offices of major international law firms, where he focused on corporate and securities law.

Steve has worked on numerous cross-border transactions for European, Asian, and Latin American issuer clients selling securities in the U.S. Within the equity capital markets space, he has done initial public offerings, follow-on offerings, secondary offerings, block trades, Rule 144 sales, private placements, registered directs, Private Investments in Public Equities (PIPEs), convertible bond/preferred offerings, and special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) transactions.

William Curtin, Partner • Genevieve G. Weiner, Partner—Restructuring
Sidley Austin LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Bill: My practice focuses on corporate reorganization, bankruptcy, bankruptcy litigation, and other insolvency-related matters. Although I represent clients in many industries, including telecom, transportation, financial services, insurance, and hospitality, my practice is currently particularly focused on healthcare and life sciences.

Genevieve: I advise various constituents in high-stakes bankruptcy cases. This sometimes means that I am representing the debtor (the company filing for bankruptcy), but my practice also encompasses representing lenders, unsecured creditor committees, and purchasers of distressed assets. As a restructuring lawyer, I have experience in a wide range of industries, including hospitality, healthcare, and real estate. 

What types of clients do you represent?

Bill: I primarily represent distressed public and private companies, but also organized creditor groups in bankruptcy cases, secured and significant unsecured creditors, distressed investors, private equity funds, and others with controlling positions in financially distressed companies.

Genevieve: I serve a very wide range of clients, from public companies to VC-type startups. Given that I also represent creditor committees—sometimes comprised of trade creditors or even individual claimants—and purchasers of distressed assets, I encounter all sorts of people in my client relationships. That is certainly part of what makes it fun!

What types of cases/deals do you work on? 

Bill: Most of my cases involve representing various constituents in chapter 11 bankruptcy cases in jurisdictions throughout the United States, as well as out-of-court restructurings. For example, I’m currently representing clients in bankruptcy cases pending in New York, Delaware, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Genevieve: I work on large chapter 11 cases in jurisdictions across the country. Right now, I am involved in chapter 11 cases pending in Florida, California, Delaware, and New York and ranging from food and beverage cases to luxury real estate.

How did you choose this practice area?

Bill: I started my career in the Army JAG Corps and spent the majority of my four years in the Army as a criminal defense attorney. I tried a murder case with an Army reservist whose civilian job was with the Department of Justice. After I got out of the Army, he hired me at DOJ to work on bankruptcy matters. Although I initially viewed bankruptcy and restructuring as a brief stop in my career, I enjoyed the practice area so much that I stuck with it first at DOJ and later in private practice.  

Genevieve: I took a chapter 11 reorganization class in law school and really enjoyed it. While I started in the general corporate practice, market timing had some influence on the course of my career. I started at the end of 2007 when the market was headed into a counter-cycle with the 2008 financial crisis looming. I proactively reached out to the restructuring group and not only really liked the work, but the people too. I’ve stuck with it ever since!

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform? 

Bill: The best part about restructuring is the variety. I regularly appear in court, counsel management teams and boards of directors facing financially distressed situations, draft motions and other pleadings, and supervise teams of associates and others. 

Genevieve: Every day is a bit different, which is part of what I like about my practice. Some days I will be in court on bankruptcy motion practice or drafting court pleadings. Other days I will be negotiating and drafting purchase and sale agreements or similar transactional documents. Of course, there are plenty of client calls sprinkled throughout the day as well as strategy meetings with my team.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Bill: Any classes in business and corporate law will be important to building a solid base of knowledge for a restructuring practice. I think it is more important, however, to seek out roles that develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The ability to develop and execute creative strategies to complex problems is the most important skill a restructuring lawyer can have. 

Genevieve: If you are interested in practicing restructuring law at a large law firm, I would strongly suggest taking a chapter 11 course in law school as well as a course on secured transactions. Having some background in the debtor and creditor concepts will give you a significant advantage when you start your legal career. 

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

Bill: The most challenging, but also the most exhilarating, aspect of restructuring is the speed with which matters develop. It is the rare case where we will have months to prepare and execute a strategy for a distressed client. We are often called upon to offer comprehensive advice in a matter of days or even hours.

Genevieve: The practice can be fast paced and often deals with unique or developing areas of the law. There isn’t always a roadmap for how to do things, which means that as a restructuring lawyer, you will need to be creative. 

What do you like best about your practice area?

Bill: I enjoy how the strategy in a restructuring matter is constantly evolving and requires lawyers to anticipate developments to the extent possible and react to unanticipated developments when necessary. Also, clients turn to us in what is often the darkest hour for their business and rely on us for effective and timely solutions, so we develop powerful connections with our clients.

Genevieve: Two big things come to mind. First, I like that my practice involves both aspects of litigation and transactional work. One day I might be in court and the next I might be reviewing an asset purchase agreement. Second, as restructuring lawyers, we are often tasked with bringing various stakeholders together to find a compromise that works for everyone. 

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

Bill: The biggest misconception is that when our group is involved with a client, that client is certainly going to file a bankruptcy case. This is the furthest thing from the truth. Our goal is always to resolve matters out of court, and we are often successful in avoiding a bankruptcy filing while still getting the client relief from its distress. 

Genevieve: I think the biggest misconception may be that when we file a company for bankruptcy, the company is shutting down or ceasing operations. That is often not the case. Instead, a chapter 11 practice is focused on helping companies reorganize and right-size their capital structure so that they can keep people employed and maintain operations. 

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area? 

Bill: We strive to involve junior lawyers in as many aspects of our practice as possible. Junior lawyers regularly do research, draft pleadings and client memoranda, and prepare outlines for court appearances. Junior lawyers also often participate in calls with clients, negotiations with opposing counsel, and court hearings.

Genevieve: Junior lawyers are fully integrated members of the team on my cases. I might ask junior lawyers to help conduct research on legal issues or take the pen on a first draft of a motion. I will often also ask junior lawyers to join calls with the client and engage in team strategy meetings.

Bill Curtin’s practice focuses on corporate reorganization, bankruptcy, bankruptcy litigation, and other insolvency-related matters. Bill represents debtors, official committees, secured and unsecured creditors, distressed investors, and private equity funds and other institutions with controlling positions in financially distressed companies. He provides strategic and practical advice to management teams and boards of directors facing financially distressed situations. He leverages his extensive and unique experience as a bankruptcy regulator and litigator with the Department of Justice to provide clients with practical solutions in a broad range of complex and high-profile restructuring matters. Bill maintains an active pro bono practice focused on representing veterans.

Genevieve Weiner is a partner in Sidley’s Restructuring group and focuses her practice on representing debtors and lenders in various bankruptcy matters, general assignments, receiverships and out-of-court restructurings, and workouts. She has represented clients across multiple industries, including healthcare, retail, hospitality, and real estate. Genevieve has also advised financial and strategic purchasers on acquisitions of distressed companies and discrete assets through section 363 and foreclosure proceedings. In 2022, the American Bankruptcy Institute named Genevieve as one of its “40 under 40” honorees. She also maintains an active pro bono practice.

Related Vault Guides
Check out some of Vault's guides that are related to this field.
Top Ranked Firms
Check out the top-ranked law firms in General Corporate.