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Overview

Healthcare law is an incredibly diverse area of practice which does not focus on a singular type of legal work. Attorneys in this field focus on the health industry in general, but the types of work available vary widely. Some lawyers counsel health care entities on a range of transactional and regulatory matters, including mergers and acquisitions and joint ventures. Others handle any litigation-related matters that arise for their health care industry clients. Some lawyers focus on compliance issues, ensuring clients are adhering to regulations and laws and conducting internal investigations for clients, while others work on the government side, enforcing regulations. This area is an exciting one because it is constantly evolving and changing, especially when it comes to digital health. Lawyers focusing on digital health may work on IP-related matters, privacy and data security, regulatory issues, policy research, and more. On the nonprofit side, lawyers may work for an organization that promotes public health, access to health care, advocacy for a specific health issue, etc. Clients in the health law arena range from hospitals and medical centers to insurance companies and pharmaceutical entities to laboratories and private equity funds—plus many more.

Featured Q&A's
Get an insider's view on working in Health Law from real lawyers in the practice area.
Heather O'Shea, Partner • Laura Koman, Associate—Health Care & Life Sciences
Jones Day

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

The Health Care & Life Sciences practice at Jones Day is a multidisciplinary team of lawyers who represent clients across the entire healthcare and life sciences spectrum, from hospital systems and academic medical centers to provider organizations, healthcare investors, and emerging companies, along with leading and startup pharma, biotech, medical device, digital health, and food and cosmetics companies in matters ranging from litigation, transactional, compliance, and regulatory. Our firm’s approach to the health sector—with an integrated global health industry team of more than 300 lawyers—affords us the opportunity to work with colleagues in other practices to best serve the firm’s health industry clients.

What types of clients do you represent?

We represent clients across the industry—from traditional healthcare provider organizations (hospitals, academic medical centers, post-acute care facilities, skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers, senior care facilities, physician groups, urgent care and ambulatory surgery centers, and telehealth/telemedicine organizations), to emerging technology and digital health enterprises, healthcare investors (PE/VC funds), manufacturers and developers of healthcare products (pharmaceuticals, biologics, medical devices, food/dietary supplements, cosmetics, tobacco products), and outsourced vendors (contract research organizations, contract manufacturers).

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Heather: My practice focuses on government enforcement—investigations and litigation involving the False Claims Act at the federal and state levels. Given the matters I work on, my practice also involves regulatory and compliance counseling. I am able to see both sides of the coin, so to speak—areas that the government is focused on, but also best practices and business solutions for addressing issues in a compliant manner.

How did you choose this practice area?

Laura: One of the things that drew me to Jones Day in the first place is the firm’s New Lawyers Group—a program that offers first-year lawyers exposure to a variety of practices and lawyers across the firm before officially joining a particular practice group. I knew that I was interested in joining a practice that allowed me to work with complex statutes and regulations, interact with regulators, and work on both litigation and transactional matters, and I tried projects in several different regulatory focused practices during my first year. My very first assignment, though, was a healthcare matter that involved interpreting state regulations in the context of remote optical health services, and I was immediately hooked. I worked directly with a partner who is an expert in the telehealth space and got to research recently enacted state regulations, interact with state regulators regarding the interpretation of the regulations, and participate in the client call to deliver our guidance. I loved it!

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Laura: One thing that I enjoy about this practice is that every day looks a little bit different. Nearly every day involves some sort of legal research, typically looking at federal or state statutes and regulations and related agency guidance to advise clients on questions that often do not have a clear-cut answer. I also do a good amount of drafting, whether it’s a formal memo containing a regulatory analysis, helping clients draft documents to set up appropriate corporate and regulatory-oriented structures for their healthcare arrangements, or drafting and advising on commercial agreements. No matter what I am working on, it usually involves close collaboration and communication with clients and with others at the firm. I am frequently collaborating with Health Care and Life Sciences lawyers in other offices (we have a presence in nearly every U.S. office, as well as globally) and with lawyers in other practice groups. Jones Day’s commitment to client service means that we bring in the right lawyers with the right experience to deliver the best work product for our clients, regardless of practice designation or office location. This is great for associates, who get the chance to work with a lot of different people and see how a big project comes together.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Heather: While a background in healthcare is always helpful, it is certainly not required. Given the multidisciplinary nature of our practice, we look for associates with a wide set of skills and experience. As far as classes, we would definitely recommend taking Administrative Law, where possible, because understanding how federal agencies like the Department of Health & Human Services operate is a critical component of our practice. Drafting, negotiations and mediation, and trial advocacy skills are all areas that would be beneficial.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

Heather: I think one of the most challenging aspects of this practice is also one of the best—this is a fast-paced industry driven by science, innovation, and an incredibly complex legal framework that is itself evolving at a rapid pace. The firm’s approach to client service allows us to access knowledge and expertise that keeps pace with the industry.

What do you like best about your practice area?

Laura: I like that the practice is constantly evolving. I learn something new with every project—there is always a new regulation or guidance document to catch up on! This also creates an opportunity for junior associates to become subject matter experts on new policy developments. In my case, I was able to work on telehealth projects at the very beginning of my career, pre-COVID, and developed a deep understanding of the digital health regulatory landscape that was very helpful when the adoption of remote services exploded during COVID. I also really enjoy working with our clients, most of whom are focused on better serving patients and improving health outcomes. To be able to help them with this work, in some small way, is very meaningful. And being at Jones Day, of course, means we get to work with clients who are the best at what they do. The projects we work on are often complex and cutting-edge and require a team-oriented approach; nowhere does a team come together better to face challenges than at Jones Day.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Laura: Junior lawyers are involved in all aspects of the projects we work on, working alongside and with the guidance of partner and senior associate mentors. Typical tasks include conducting legal and regulatory research, communicating with clients and regulators, drafting pleadings and motions, drafting regulatory submissions, drafting and revising transactional documents, reviewing documents (due diligence or discovery), and participating in witness interviews. My personal favorite task is conducting deep regulatory research and trying to distill that into practical guidance for our clients.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

Heather: The clear trend in the health sector is toward collaboration of participants across the industry. And while the pandemic accelerated this trend, it was in fact emerging before the health crisis. There are a number of factors causing this, including: globalization of healthcare, innovation and new technologies, new entrants and new roles for health industry participants, consumer-driven healthcare, and pressures on pricing and demand for transparency. As the industry evolves, so too must our legal practice and the way we approach the clients we serve. This is where Jones Day excels thanks to an international footprint, cross-practice collaboration, and client-oriented culture. This allows us to deliver not only on a specific matter, but also to appreciate other factors that may impact the client.

Heather O'Shea is a co-leader of the firm's Health Care & Life Sciences practice. For more than 20 years, she has represented clients in federal and state government investigations and litigation involving fraud and abuse enforcement, including the False Claims Act (FCA), the Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS), Stark Law, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. Heather represents clients on regulatory and compliance matters involving Medicare and Medicaid, fraud and abuse laws, reimbursement regulations, the Physician Payments Sunshine Act (Open Payments), clinical research compliance, and U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) regulations. She has extensive experience conducting internal investigations, handling voluntary disclosures, and counseling clients on refunds to Medicare. Heather also has significant experience advising clients on compliance program development and implementation, and conducting assessments of existing compliance programs.

Laura Koman represents healthcare and life sciences companies on complex regulatory and compliance matters in emerging areas. Laura advises large healthcare systems and national provider organizations on unique legal, regulatory, and reimbursement structures impacting the remote delivery of healthcare services and multijurisdictional digital health strategy. Laura also represents global life sciences organizations on the contractual, regulatory, and ethical issues associated with clinical research, including those related to decentralized clinical trials and clinical trial diversity initiatives.

Gregory Fosheim, Partner • Sumaya Noush, Associate—Healthcare
McDermott Will & Emery

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Greg: I consider myself a full-service healthcare operationalist, meaning I advise clients across the industry on how to perform in a complex regulatory world. This may include advising on transactions, providing billing and coding guidance, counseling on licensing and enrollment requirements, and addressing myriad compliance and business concerns. My practice also has deep focus on the clinical and diagnostic laboratory industry, delivery of proton therapy, and advising on health equity and non-discrimination. I also present and write about these matters to lawyers and business owners alike.   

Sumaya: My focused representation of hospitals, health systems, academic medical centers, and other healthcare providers in complex corporate transactions, combined with my deep knowledge of the healthcare regulatory environment, allows me to provide clients with comprehensive and practical advice regarding their operations, corporate compliance, governance, and business strategies. In addition to my client advisement, I speak and write on emerging regulatory and corporate matters.  

What types of clients do you represent?

Greg: My practice engages with healthcare organizations across the industry and companies that interact with the delivery of healthcare in some way. This includes traditional hospitals and healthcare providers but also laboratories, clinical research organizations, biotech and digital health disruptors, accreditation organizations, pharmaceutical companies, health plans, and others. Healthcare truly is everywhere.

Sumaya: I advise hospitals and healthcare systems on strategic transactions and regulatory matters. Currently, I am working on a high-profile, cross-market transaction on behalf of a health system client that will be acquired by an integrated healthcare delivery system. The parties’ estimated combined revenue at closing will be $102.3 billion—about five times greater than the next highest combined revenue of a health system merger in 2023.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Greg: The McDermott Healthcare Department prides itself on a deep and broad array of subject matter experts that can serve a wide variety of healthcare industry clients. If it has to do with healthcare—we have got it covered. This has afforded both Sumaya and me the opportunity to work on front-page transactions and extremely complex regulatory questions every day.

How did you choose this practice area?

Greg: During public health graduate school, I had a work study job at the Centers for Disease Control that turned into a full-time microbiologist position focusing on antimicrobial-resistant healthcare infections. When the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010, I had been debating a Ph.D. and decided the ACA gave me an opportunity to transition industries without disregarding my prior experience. 

Sumaya’s interest in healthcare stems from her background in medical ethics and health policy, where her scholarship focused on reducing disparities in healthcare and assuring equitable access to care. 

For both of us, the aspirational nature of the ACA to improve health access, affordability, and outcomes has motivated and undergirded our practices. Despite having different practice types, we each advise clients to this day on the multitude of industry changes that were born out of the ACA and the challenges that come with the economics of shifting from volume to value-based care.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Sumaya: While there is no typical day, we have become accustomed to learning something new every day! Being an effective healthcare lawyer requires that we stay apprised of legal and regulatory developments affecting the healthcare industry and as we support our clients through challenges and opportunities. We each also spend considerable time mentoring more junior lawyers and supporting the firm in its diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives.

Greg: Sumaya said it well: a typical day is predictably unpredictable. 

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Greg: Of course, law students should take healthcare-specific courses if they are offered, but the most valuable courses I took were Administrative Law and Advanced Legal Research. The U.S. healthcare system is heavily regulated, with guidance more likely found in agency materials than case law. Understanding how regulations are promulgated (and where to find them) is integral to staying up to date. I also cannot underemphasize the importance of “speaking healthcare” for anyone wishing to enter this discipline, which can be accomplished by reading industry blogs and listservs, writing on emerging regulatory developments, participating in bar associations, and generally being curious.

Sumaya: I encourage any form of experiential learning that simulates client service. Client clinics and models of legal practice, like mock negotiations, board presentations, and trials are all invaluable experiences, regardless of subject matter area. I also encourage networking early and often with healthcare legal practitioners. One of the easiest ways to do so is by getting involved with local and national healthcare bar organizations. I started as a student member of the Illinois Association of Healthcare Attorneys and worked my way up to being a member of its Board of Directors.     

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

Healthcare represents at least one-fifth of the U.S. economy, with everyone consuming healthcare services at some point in their lives. But the ever-changing regulatory landscape makes health law an often confusing morass to navigate. The confusion creates an equally challenging and rewarding specialty practice area with clients rarely turning to us because they have an easy question. Health lawyers are lifelong learners and anyone—junior or senior—can add value by studying the newest laws and regulations and explaining clearly and succinctly how those change how our clients can or should do business.      

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Our attorneys are thought leaders across the industry, with many of the members of the Healthcare Practice Group serving in leadership positions at the firm and in local, state, and national organizations, and we are beyond fortunate to have a phenomenal team of staff professionals who drive business development strategies, expand client relationships, and increase brand recognition. This team effort to strive to be #alwaysbetter has resulted in a sterling reputation with clients and McDermott being named as Vault’s #1 Healthcare firm for seven consecutive years while accumulating numerous other best-in-class rankings.   

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

Healthcare is both cyclical and unpredictable. In many ways, we expect a “back to the future” in how providers and payors align themselves (i.e., greater coordination and alignment between those who provide care and those who pay for care). In other respects, the lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic exposed significant discordance in how healthcare is received by many Americans. We anticipate that the industry will continue to explore how digital health and artificial intelligence can make healthcare more convenient, equitable, accurate, and affordable, and the complex regulatory and reimbursement frameworks of these emerging areas will keep healthcare lawyers in high demand. 

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain at this practice area at your firm?

Summer associates in the Healthcare Department can expect to sample a variety of corporate and regulatory matters which will continue upon their return as junior associates. Summer associates are expected to engage on real client matters and will be exposed to key health laws and regulations, see how supervising lawyers advise clients in digestible and pragmatic ways, and provide meaningful support by researching emerging areas of health law. On the corporate side, summer associates and junior healthcare lawyers can expect to prepare or revise corporate governance documents and board resolutions and complete legal, operational, and financial due diligence. On the regulatory side, summer associates and junior healthcare lawyers can expect to research state and federal healthcare laws, update licenses/permit registrations, and draft or edit clients’ policies and procedures to address areas of detected noncompliance or operational deficiencies.

Gregory Fosheim (he/him) provides counsel on a wide array of corporate, transactional, and regulatory compliance matters across the healthcare and life sciences industry. Drawing on his extensive laboratory and public health background and insight, he regularly advises on the regulatory oversight and reimbursement of clinical and diagnostic laboratory services, anatomic pathology testing, clinical research, and assisted reproductive technology and represents hospitals, health systems, and physician practice management companies in all aspects of transactional and operational matters, particularly those with regulatory, licensing, accreditation, and policy considerations.

Greg uses his public health background to write, speak, and advise on quality, access, and equity in the provision of healthcare services and serves as co-chair of McDermott’s LGBTQ+ Affinity Group.

Sumaya M. Noush (she/her) counsels multistate hospitals and health systems, specialty hospitals, academic medical centers, and other healthcare organizations on strategic and operational matters, including mergers, asset and membership/stock transactions, joint ventures, hospital and physician affiliations, disaffiliations, dissolutions, divestitures, management of ownership transitions, entity structure formation and governance, medical staff bylaws, credentialing, peer review, and privileging as well as survey, certification, and accreditation matters.

Sumaya closely partners alongside clients as they explore strategies for the future health of their communities, their missions, and their business goals, advising them through the challenges of daily operations and recent regulatory developments.

Sumaya is committed to improving the diversity of the profession as an Associate Board Director to the Chicago Committee on Minorities in Large Law Firms and an alumna of the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity institution.

Elizabeth Richards, Partner • John Manthei, Partner—Corporate
Latham & Watkins

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Liz: Our practice covers four major areas. First is our core work focused on regulatory counseling of clients whose products and businesses are subject to FDA oversight (including clients who are developing new and innovative drugs, medical devices, digital health products/apps, cosmetics, foods, dietary supplements, and other kinds of products). Second, we partner with our colleagues across the firm on transactions involving such entities or their products, including M&A, capital markets deals like initial public offerings, private equity investments, and financings. Third, we work together with our firm’s litigation teams on litigation matters as subject matter experts advising on the FDA regulatory framework, where the litigation at issue may be predicated on a regulatory issue, where the regulatory issues can dictate litigation strategy or where we bring suit against the FDA challenging an FDA policy or decision under the Administrative Procedure Act. Finally, we lead the negotiation of our clients’ preclinical and clinical trials-related contracts, facilitating agreements with investigators, clinical sites, clinical research organizations, and other third-party vendors whom our clients rely on to generate data to support marketing applications for our clients’ products.

What types of clients do you represent? 

John: Our team guides the world’s leading medical device, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology companies, from innovative startups to mature public companies. Simply put, we advise the companies at the heart of healthcare and medical innovation.


What types of cases/deals do you work on? 

Liz: My practice is a good mix of the areas I’d mentioned earlier, and on any given day I am working on a range of matters for 10 to 15 different clients.

John: Our practice covers the gamut of deals and regulatory counseling matters involving FDA-regulated entities, from M&A to private equity investment to investigations. And we’ve served as outside counsel on every major legislative initiative affecting the industry for the last 20 years, helping Congress understand the policies it proposes and helping companies navigate the laws Congress ultimately passes and the regulations the FDA ultimately promulgates.

How did you choose this practice area?

Liz: I have always wanted to work in healthcare and initially was pre-med in college but wasn’t sure it would be the best fit. I explored other opportunities in this industry and decided to attend law school in a joint Master of Public Health/JD program. I learned there are a number of different specialties within the practice of healthcare law beyond FDA regulatory work. I sought out firms with strong and growing healthcare practices with a range of specialties. This naturally led me to Latham. During my time in the firm’s Unassigned Program as a first-year associate, I sought out work in the healthcare and life sciences practice group and I fell in love with the FDA regulatory practice.

John: The variety and constant change of pace drew me into the FDA regulatory practice. The matters we work on involve incredibly challenging and novel legal issues, and we face them head-on at every stage of the product life cycle. Originally, I thought I wanted to be a litigator, but in this practice I probably do more advocacy work on a daily basis than I would in another practice.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

John: A typical day simply doesn’t occur in our practice—I like that unpredictability from day to day. I may work with a medical device company on an approval, then help with a merger agreement, before jumping on a call with a private equity sponsor to discuss an investment. I can count on a variety of issues to address each day, and I’ve come to learn that the only thing to expect for the day ahead is that it will differ from the day prior.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Liz: Take a class in administrative law; not only is the material interesting, but it also equips law students with an understanding of how the administrative agencies like the FDA procedurally engage in their regulatory functions and how they fit within the U.S. legal system—an understanding essential to this practice, as it enables lawyers to identify the pressure points in advocating for our clients’ positions. Our practice frequently involves direct engagement with the FDA, including in meetings with the agency regarding a particular product application, through submission of comments on a proposed rulemaking or draft guidance, and preparing citizen petitions requesting the agency take or refrain from taking certain actions, among many others. Many of these avenues for industry advocacy before their regulator are taught in administrative law.

What do you like best about your practice area?


Liz: Most importantly the practice is focused at the highest level on improving public health and getting patients the care they need.

John: Harnessing and assisting innovators in the medical field, working on everything from new treatments for cancer to disease prevention, always feels rewarding. I get to work with the most brilliant clients trying to solve our most pressing issues in healthcare, and I get to do so surrounded by the highest level of talent.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

John: People perceive regulatory lawyers as “by the book” individuals who take pleasure in saying “No.” But our practice is quite commercially minded, and we understand that our clients are businesses. As a practice, we always try to creatively address novel issues in the law in a way that takes into account the client’s business needs.

Also, when you build a regulatory practice, the immediate thought isn’t that you’ll be involved with advocacy, private equity, M&A, investigations, and so on. But our integration with other practices in the firm means we explore many facets of the law. That’s something unique about our practice at Latham.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

John: Fundamentally, our junior lawyers help us determine what is being regulated and why, and then take those answers and develop the broader strategy. Junior associates play an instrumental role in figuring out the solutions we offer to clients. Early on, tasks primarily include research and writing, but we facilitate client interaction as quickly as possible. As soon as a junior lawyer can handle that direct interaction, we open up those opportunities to them.

Liz: We recognize that junior lawyers in an FDA practice often face a steep learning curve. We work to compensate for that by investing a lot of time training our people. The work that junior lawyers do in our practice brings them up to speed on the substance, unlocking new opportunities to them as they become conversant in the regulatory frameworks applicable to our clients. We also staff our matters leanly, often with just one partner and one junior associate. Consequently, from the day they begin their legal careers, junior associates get access to and learn from lawyers who have developed the expertise in their area of practice and have been doing this work for a very long time.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

Liz: Our practice is intentionally sized to give lawyers the training and personal attention they need to take on any role a lawyer may want to eventually seek, whether that’s counsel or partner at the firm, in-house in the private sector, or a move into the government, including the Department of Justice, Congress, or the FDA (each have been landing pads for our associates in recent years). We pride ourselves on keeping open lines of communication with our associates regarding career opportunities and progression. Our FDA lawyers generally do not leave Latham to work at a different firm’s FDA practice, which is a testament to the group here at Latham. However, we support our attorneys in any moves they may pursue—for example, we have had several associates come to leadership to express an interest in roles in the government, and we have assisted those attorneys in identifying those opportunities, including an associate who recently moved to a policy role at the FDA and another who left for an incredible opportunity on the Hill. Our goal is to create the best lawyers that we can, and then position them for wherever they want their career to go. While we hope that means remaining at Latham, we are fully supportive if attorneys want to explore other opportunities.

 

John Manthei, Global Chair of the Healthcare & Life Sciences Practice, advises on regulatory matters involving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the medical device, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology industries. He has been involved extensively in Administrative Procedure Act litigation. Since 2000, Mr. Manthei has represented industries as counsel in nearly every major FDA legislative initiative. He has testified before Congress on several occasions and is ranked Band 1 by Chambers USA 2022 for Healthcare: Pharmaceutical/Medical Products Regulatory - District of Columbia. He was inducted into the “Hall of Fame” by The Legal 500 US.

Elizabeth (Liz) Richards, a Healthcare & Life Sciences partner, helps clients navigate FDA-related regulatory, compliance, enforcement, transactional, and legislative/policy matters. She counsels clients traversing the legal labyrinth to introduce new products and maintain compliance once commercialized, advocating for them before the FDA. She advises medical device and pharmaceutical clients on contracts related to all aspects of preclinical and clinical research. She regularly advises on regulatory matters in connection with capital markets, private equity, and M&A transactions involving FDA-regulated entities. Ms. Richards has been recognized by multiple publications, including in Chambers USA 2022, The Legal 500 US, LMG Life Sciences, and The Diversity Journal.

Dana Dombey, Partner—Healthcare
McDermott Will & Emery

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

I handle complex transactional and healthcare regulatory matters, including private equity transactions. I also serve as outside general counsel to healthcare businesses, helping address all their legal needs. 

What types of clients do you represent? 

I have represented a wide range of clients, including private equity funds and their portfolio companies, healthcare business founders, and digital health and other emerging healthcare companies.

What types of cases/deals do you work on? 

McDermott’s healthcare practice has given me the opportunity to work on a broad range of matters.  

For example, I worked on a cross-border transaction combining a U.S.-based business and a European-based business to create the largest physician practice in the space worldwide, represented the company in connection with their U.S. legal needs for several years, and most recently worked with the company on its sale for upwards of $3 billion.  

I was also on a team that helped a client prepare for a meeting with the federal government to discuss proposed changes to regulations and other support for innovation in the healthcare industry, with the goal of using technology and other innovation to expand access to care and improve outcomes.   

How did you choose this practice area?

I was fortunate to be interviewed by a number of firms for a summer associate position. Walking out of my McDermott interview, I knew I wanted to start my career working with the attorneys I met that day. In addition to being smart and hardworking, they seemed to have a supportive, innovative, fun, and collaborative culture that I was eager to join. 

If I had to start over, I would (once again) follow my instinct to work with the team where I expected to best fit in and find the most mentorship, training, and support. 

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Every day is different! I lead several teams, so I connect with them frequently to ensure we are working in the same direction. I also spend significant time advising clients on strategy regarding transaction structures and regulatory compliance matters, drafting and negotiating transaction documents, and overseeing due diligence and deal execution.

Finally, I spend a fair bit of time training and mentoring more junior attorneys—I would not be where I am without support from my mentors and if I can help others in their career development, I will always take the time to do so.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I recommend every law student expand their horizons by taking classes that interest them, and that will challenge their thinking and expand their horizons. Most skills will be learned on the job but having the ability to think critically and creatively is paramount to succeeding in practice.

Having a solid business foundation (basic tax, accounting) can be helpful when starting a transactional practice, and taking administrative law and healthcare (fraud and abuse, privacy) courses are helpful for a healthcare regulatory practice.

What do you like best about your practice area?

I enjoy every opportunity to work alongside clients to develop creative solutions to their challenges. I also love working in highly collaborative teams of colleagues (who are also friends) from whom I learn every day.   

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

That the scope of our practice is limited to providing substantive legal advice. Attorneys are most successful when they can understand their clients’ businesses, develop practical business sense, and become a “trusted advisor” by providing practical advice that takes into consideration the business needs, circumstances, risk tolerance, and available resources.  

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

McDermott is the preeminent healthcare law firm, which has allowed me to work on complex and sophisticated matters with the support of incredible subject matter experts. Whenever a novel issue arises, I am confident my team either has addressed it before or has the expertise to address it thoughtfully and efficiently. Further, because McDermott’s healthcare practice is defined by industry stakeholders as opposed to practice areas (transactional, regulatory, litigation), being part of the healthcare practice allows our attorneys to become very well rounded.

More importantly for me, McDermott supports associates in being innovative and entrepreneurial in their practices. Because our matters are staffed leanly and we expose junior associates to all aspects of our matters, they are given the opportunity to play key roles, offer substantive contributions, and advance as quickly as they are ready.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

The healthcare industry will continue to evolve with the development of new technologies. Patients’ interaction with healthcare will look very different in a few years due to the explosion of new technologies. It is very exciting to be involved in the healthcare industry, especially as an attorney in a position to help (a) shape laws and regulations to better reflect the needs of patients and the industry’s evolution and (b) investors in the industry understand and adapt their investment strategy to evolution in the space. 

A partner in McDermott’s industry-leading Healthcare Law practice, Dana represents private equity funds, founders and management teams of healthcare companies (including digital health and other emerging companies), and strategic investors nationwide in connection with a wide range of corporate, transactional, and regulatory matters. Her full-service capabilities and ability to provide seamless legal counsel on complex strategic and operational issues have created endless opportunities for the firm to partner with investors on transactions and to continue providing support beyond those transactions by representing newly acquired portfolio companies in their growth strategies.

Dana previously served as Practice Area Leader for McDermott’s Physician Practice Management Practice Area, a newly formed subgroup of the firm’s Healthcare Practice Group.  Dana was recently appointed to lead McDermott’s Healthcare Private Equity Subgroup of the Healthcare Practice Group.  

Previously, Dana served as a foreign law clerk for the Honorable Uzi Vogelman at the Supreme Court of Israel. While in law school, she served as a student attorney at the Harvard Transactional Law Clinics and as a law clerk at the University of Miami’s Office of the General Counsel.  Dana was born and grew up in Caracas, Venezuela.

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